Church History Class Makes Collages

By Olivia Short ‘17

Here at Mercy, our religion teachers are given a tough task: assigning a variety of projects so that each student has the chance to do something she likes. Ms. Uhl has been doing just that with her sophomore Church History classes– we’ve had some writing projects, some video projects, etc. But this past week, Ms. Uhl’s sophomores were assigned a collage project; each student got to choose her own saint, do some research, and create a collage based on that saint’s life.

Sophomores generally enjoyed the project, most of them saying that they enjoyed the freedom that went along with it. Alex Stevens ‘17 reports that she enjoys working alone on projects because it’s less stressful. Steph Lohbeck ‘17 enjoyed working at her own pace not having to compromise on creative decisions.

Other students liked the medium of the project and thought that a PicCollage was a good way to show what they had learned. Maria Busken ‘17 said, “[A collage] is a good visual to have and makes it easier to remember things about our saint.” Sarah Braunstein ‘17 enjoyed using PicCollage and compared the project to a puzzle.

Alyssa Cassidy ‘17 appreciated the research aspect of the project, and was excited to learn more in-depth information about her confirmation saint.

But, no project can be a smash hit. A few of the sophomores I talked to felt that the project was somewhat rushed. Tay Sauer ‘17 felt that she didn’t have enough class time to give the project the attention it deserved, and called it a “throw this together and get a grade”-esque project.

But regardless of opinions, it’s obvious that the sophomores made some seriously beautiful pictures. Check these babies out!!

Maria Busken ’17 aspires to be a doctor, so she chose St. Drogo, the patron of the sick and deformed. Busken remarks that she admires Drogo’s love of god even in the midst of sickness. Photo courtesy Maria Busken ’17

Maria Busken ’17 aspires to be a doctor, so she chose St. Drogo, the patron of the sick and deformed. Busken remarks that she admires Drogo’s love of god even in the midst of sickness. Photo courtesy Maria Busken ’17

Rachel Meyer ’17 centered her collage around Sir Thomas More. Meyer was struck by his devotion to education, the impacts of which can still be seen today. Photo courtesy Rachel Meyer ’17

Rachel Meyer ’17 centered her collage around Sir Thomas More. Meyer was struck by his devotion to education, the impacts of which can still be seen today. Photo courtesy Rachel Meyer ’17

Sarah Braunstein ’17 chose St. Maria Goretti for her collage. Braunstein admires Maria Goretti for the way she defended her purity and loyalty to God. Photo courtesy Sarah Braunstein ’17

Sarah Braunstein ’17 chose St. Maria Goretti for her collage. Braunstein admires Maria Goretti for the way she defended her purity and loyalty to God. Photo courtesy Sarah Braunstein ’17

Lastly, I chose to do my project on Joan of Arc. As a mentally ill person, her story resonates deeply with me. Joan showed symptoms of schizophrenia and is an important historical figure in mentally ill communities. Photo courtesy Olivia Short ’17

Lastly, I chose to do my project on Joan of Arc. As a mentally ill person, it’s super important to me that a mentally ill woman like Joan achieved sainthood. She showed symptoms of schizophrenia and is an important historical figure in mentally ill communities. Photo courtesy Olivia Short ’17

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